On Elevated Ground: Ritual Practice at Early Native American Platform Mounds in the Deep South | Olde English District

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On Elevated Ground: Ritual Practice at Early Native American Platform Mounds in the Deep South

Friday, August 23, 2019 - 12:00pm until 1:00pm

Join us for “On Elevated Ground: Ritual Practice at Early Native American Platform Mounds in the Deep South," presented by Dr. Meg Kassabaum, Weingarten Assistant Curator for North America, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania. The construction of earthen mounds has a long history in the American South, beginning as early as 5000 BC. Around AD 700, an important shift from the construction of burial mounds to the construction of platform mounds is often assumed to be associated with parallel shifts in economic, social, and political changes within moundbuilding communities. Recent excavations at two mound centers constructed during this time and an exhaustive review of early platform mounds in the Eastern United States has suggested that the relationship between these various shifts is more complicated than often assumed and that it was negotiated through communal ritual practices including feasting, bear ceremonialism, and monument construction. For more details about this event, please visit the website here.

Location Details:

119 South Main St.
Lancaster, SC 29720
Phone:
(803) 313-7172
Email:
usclnasp@mailbox.sc.edu

Lancaster County sits within the lands once held by the Catawba Indian Nation, and the current Catawba Reservation is located about 15 miles from the campus of USC Lancaster. With strong geographical and historical ties to the Catawba, USCL has begun to develop curricular and public programs focused on Native American art and culture, with a special emphasis on the Catawba and other Native communities in South Carolina. The Center houses the world’s largest single collection of Catawba Indian pottery, five galleries, the only archive in South Carolina devoted in Native American history and culture, an archaeology lab, meeting and classroom spaces, and more.  Launched in 2018, the Native American South Carolina Archive (NASCA) is a comprehensive digital archive for tribal histories, photos, correspondence, oral histories, and more (www.nativesouthcarolina.org). Every March, USCL hosts Native American Studies Week with lectures, performances, and arts and crafts sales. The gardens are a site on the summer SC Ag + Art Tour.  Admission is free.